Scott Cooper and the Barrelmakers

Scott Cooper, front and holding a guitar, with his band Scott Cooper and the Barrelmakers, channeled the Coastside into music with his song “Ghosts of La Honda” on the album “Batik in Blue.”

By Stacy Trevenon

Santa Cruz-based musician Scott Cooper plays regularly on the Coastside, either solo or with an ensemble. But his musical contribution to the Coastside goes farther than that. It includes a song on his newly released CD that he hopes captures the essence of a storied South Coast town and how it has not changed.

His album “Batik in Blue” includes the song “Ghosts of La Honda.” Lively and toe-tapping in spirit, it touches on timelessness with an overall salute to the ghosts of the coast of California.

“It has a spirit of its own that seems to transcend time and people,” said Cooper.

Cooper plays in the Gary Gates Band and also in Scott Cooper and the Barrelmakers, a play on words since the word “cooper” meant a barrel maker in past times. Performing either solo or in a band, he has appeared at Sam's Chowder House, Alice's Restaurant, Apple Jack's in La Honda, at the Pescadero Country Store and the La Honda fair.

It was when he was traveling to a gig at Alice's Restaurant that inspiration for “Ghosts of La Honda” struck.

“I was driving up (Highway) 84 and it came to me,” he said simply.

His album “Batik in Blue” is available through Amazon, cdbaby, iTunes and more.

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